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Equipment and Economics

The Savage Coast setting provides several types of weapons and equipment new to the AD&D game. In addition, a number of special materials exist for making useful items in this region. This chapter describes those new items and materials, and includes notes regarding changed prices and availability of certain equipment.

Money

The Savage Coast uses the monetary system presented in the PHB (unless the Savage Coast is placed into a world with a different standard). However, barter is popular in many of the regions of the coast. In addition, coins made on the Savage Coast have a pinkish glow due to contamination by vermeil during casting. Savage Coast traders immediately recognise coins from other regions and may not accept them, at least at full value.

Several of the nations of the coast mint coinage, including Slagovich, Torreón, Narvaez, Saragón, Almarrón, Gargoña, Cimmaron, Eusdria, Robrenn, Renardy, Bellayne, Herath, and Nimmur. However, sizes are reasonably similar, so a Cimmaron copper piece is worth the same as an Eusdrian copper piece.

Copper pieces and gold pieces are minted by each of the nations named here, except Robrenn. Each of the nations named here, except for Eusdria, also mints silver coins (this is the only coin minted by Robrenn). Only the baronies named here, plus Eusdria, Bellayne, and Slagovich, make coins of electrum. Platinum coins are rare but can occasionally be found in the baronies, Renardy, Bellayne, Herath, and Slagovich. See Table 15.1 for names of coins along the Savage Coast.

Special Materials

Most weapons, armour, and equipment in the AD&D game campaign are made using carbon steel. On the Savage coast, some weapons and equipment are made of unusual materials.

The enduks and manscorpions craft bronze armour, but few others use this metal. Most tribal cultures craft their weapons from stone, bone, wood, and other simple, natural materials. The ee'aar use weapons of glass (actually glassteel), which have spread somewhat into other places. Ee'aar sometimes even make armour of glassteel. In addition, red steel weapons are becoming popular on the coast, spreading from the Savage Baronies. In some places, red steel is crafted into armour (albeit rarely).

Table 15.2: WEAPON MATERIALS

Material

Cost

Weight

Damage

Attack

Steel

100%

100%

Glassteel

500%

50%

Red steel

1000%

50%

Bone

30%

50%

-1

-1

Stone

50%

75%

-1

-2

Wood

10%

50%

-2

-3

Special materials of the Savage Coast are detailed in the following text. The attack and damage adjustments for special weapons are listed in Table 15.2. The damage modifier applies to the weapon's normal damage, down to a minimum of 1 point of damage per hit. The attack modifier applies to all attack rolls with a weapon of the given material, but it does not apply to missile weapons. The chart also lists the relative weight and cost of weapons made of alternate materials. For the price and weights of other metals used for equipment, refer to Chapter 6 of the DMG. Weapons made with other metals cause the same damage as steel weapons, unless made entirely of a soft metal such as silver or gold. Soft-metal weapons are treated like wooden weapons in regard to damage and attack adjustments.

Note that rules presented here take precedence over those presented in other sources.

Stone, Bone, and Wood

The less technologically advanced cultures of the Savage Coast are unable to work metal. As for phanatons and wallaras, they prefer to use materials other than metal for weapons and equipment. Gurrash have not yet learned the skills needed to make metal items; caymas can do fine metalwork but do not smelt metal; a few shazaks are learning the skills of smelting and forging but are still unable to make high-quality steel weapons, usually trading for steel weapons and equipment.

Weapons of natural materials are usually crafted using primitive tools. A tribe's weapon-maker might have a stone tool that is used to scrape wood into shape or chip flint. Points of wooden weapons are typically hardened in a fire. Stone weapons are typically made using flint, though some (usually in the eastern lands of the Savage Coast) use obsidian instead. Other details regarding the construction of weapons from natural materials can be found in the description of the weaponsmithing (crude) Non-weapon proficiency in the previous chapter.

In general, weapons of stone, bone, and wood are not as sturdy as their steel counterparts. Stone and bone weapons are brittle and do not hold an edge well. Wood is typically more supple, so it breaks less often. However, wood does not hold an edge or point well, and it can be bent relatively easily. Whenever a bone, stone, or wooden weapon hits its target, roll 1d20. If the roll is a 1, the weapon breaks or is so badly damaged that it can no longer be used effectively. This roll should not be made for blunt wooden weapons, such as the club or quarterstaff, which do not break easily.

Stone, bone, and wooden weapons are less effective than their metal counterparts. If a weapon (or weapon-head in the case of spears, arrows, and so forth) normally constructed with steel is instead made from stone, bone, or wood, it has a worse chance to hit than normal, and causes less damage, as shown on Table 15.2.

Table 15.1: MONEY ON THE SAVAGE COAST

Baronies

Slagovich

Eusdria

Robrenn

Renardy

Bellayne

Herath

Nimmur

 

CP

Centa

Stonik

Groschen

--

Sou

Penny

Zet

Unu

SP

Dies1

Viller

--

Groat

Écu

Shilling

Rezhna

Eshuk

EP

Medio

Levu

Taler

--

--

Quid

--

--

GP

Oro

Korun

Geld

--

Renár

Pound

Vaim

Ver

PP

Real2

Halav

--

--

Roi

Crown

Rach

--

1. Pronounced dee-EHS

2. Pronounced ray-AHL

Note that weapons such as clubs, quarterstaves, bolas, and nonakas are normally made with wood, stone, or bone. The modifiers in Table 15.2 do not apply to any of these weapons, and they need not be checked for breakage when they hit successfully. Making such weapons out of metal instead of natural materials does not give them any damage or attack bonuses, though it does increase their weight and cost. Steel versions of wooden weapons weigh twice as much and cost 10 times as much; steel versions of stone weapons weigh about a third more and cost twice as much.

The brol (stone axe), hessta (bone-tipped dart), and maga (club lined with shards of stone or bone) are something of a special case. When constructed with metal, they hit successfully more often and cause slightly more damage, as explained under their individual descriptions later in this chapter. Also, stone weapons shaped with the stone shape spell or the Shape Stone Legacy do not suffer any of the penalties normally attributed to stone weapons. They are less brittle and do not break as easily; the better control of shaping also allows them to attack and cause damage as metal weapons.

Buying and selling primitive weapons can be difficult. Of all the tribal cultures, only the shazaks care to use money; other primitive races barter for their needs. Characters who wish to buy a primitive weapon from a tribe member must offer something of the same approximate value in trade. (Of course, the item must also be something the tribe member desires.) Tribe members trading for more advanced weapons pay by barter as well.

Glassteel

The ee'aar construct weapons of glass, causing them to acquire the properties of steel with the glassteel or minor glassteel spells (the latter is described in the "Magic" chapter). Ee'aar also make glassteel elven chain mail; this is always made for winged beings, either ee'aar or enduks. Some ee'aar wizards enchant glass items such as tools or decorations, while the most skilled wizards of the ee'aar homeland enchant large pieces of glass used to construct homes and other buildings. Note that the price for glassteel listed in Table 15.2 is for glassteel items sold outside the ee'aar lands or to anyone other than ee'aar or enduks.

Items made of glassteel radiate magic. Weapons of glassteel are considered magical for purposes of striking beings that can be hit only by magical weapons, but they grant no bonuses to attack or damage rolls unless enchanted for that purpose.

Red Steel

Items of red steel are a valued commodity in the lands of the Savage Coast. The material is almost always used to forge weapons because weapons of red steel can strike beings normally hit only by weapons of at least a +1 enchantment, as well as those creatures normally hit only by silver or cold iron. However, red steel weapons grant no bonuses to attack or damage rolls unless enchanted for that purpose.

Information on red steel armour can be found in the next chapter. General information on red steel can be found in "The Curse and the Legacies" chapter and the "Magic" chapter.

The price in Table 15.2 is the price at which red steel is available to most people. Inheritors can purchase the substance from other Inheritors at half that price. Since Inheritors use so much cinnabryl, thereby converting it into red steel, they seldom have difficulty locating a supply. An Inheritor never overcharges another Inheritor (even one from a different order), but he may refuse to sell at all. When dealing with people outside the orders, Inheritors usually sell red steel for the price listed.

Table 15.3: SPECIAL ITEMS

Item or Material

Price

Cinnabryl (per ounce)

1 gp

Cinnabryl amulet (8 ounces)

12 gp

Cinnabryl talisman (16 ounces)

32 gp

Crimson essence

200 gp

Crimson essence base

50 gp

Crimson essence ingredients

5 gp

Crimson essence vial

5 gp

Potion vial

3 gp

Red steel (per ounce)

2 sp

Smokepowder (per ounce)

1 gp

Steel (per ounce)

1 cp

Steel seed (per ounce)

1 sp

Vermeil (per ounce)

1 sp

New Equipment

Since so many magical items and substances exist on the Savage Coast, most can be purchased on the open market, at least in the eastern and central coastal regions.

An ounce of cinnabryl, which has a volume of slightly less than a cubic half-inch, is usually unshaped metal, though it might be pounded into a coin-like shape. This is the usual amount purchased by commoners. An amulet is cinnabryl crafted into a bit of jewellery, usually a bracelet, necklace, pendant, or brooch. These items are worn by wealthier people, such as merchants, nobles, and adventurers. An amulet weighing eight ounces protects the wearer for eight weeks (as explained in "The Curse and the Legacies" chapter). By comparison, a cubic inch of gold weighs approximately 11 ounces. An eight-ounce amulet is by far the most common size available, though larger amulets can be constructed at a cost of 15 sp per additional ounce. A depleted eight-ounce amulet provides two ounces of red steel.

A cinnabryl talisman resembles an amulet, but it is larger and has an empty space built into it to hold a crimson essence vial. Talismans are almost always pendants (up to 16 ounces in weight) or bracelets (up to eight ounces), because these are the most secure holders. A clasped compartment holds the vial in place, and usually the talisman is designed to hide its vial from view. Talismans are almost never smaller than eight ounces. They cost 2 gp per ounce.

Crimson essence grants a Legacy to the person who drinks it. (The potion's precise effects are detailed in the next chapter.) A single dose of crimson essence contains one fluid ounce of liquid. Crimson essence base, the liquid initially placed in the vial, must be subjected to the magical radiance of cinnabryl for a time to transform into the potion. Crimson essence ingredients are the materials required by an alchemist to make crimson essence base. These ingredients include one ounce of vermeil, plus pure water and a few ingredients known only to alchemists.

Brewing crimson essence requires a special vial. The vial is actually double walled, and the potion base is poured between them. This leaves the centre of the vial empty to gather the magical radiance of cinnabryl to evenly permeate the potion base. The glass used in this type of vial is heavy, made with about an ounce of steel seed. Compare the price of this special vial to the price of a standard potion vial, which is made of leaded glass and able to hold between two and four fluid ounces of liquid.

The prices for unworked steel and red steel provide similar comparison. This indicates how much a cinnabryl amulet can be sold for once it has depleted into red steel. Note that an ounce of red steel has twice the volume of an ounce of steel, because red steel weighs only half as much.

The price given for vermeil applies only if the material is purchased. A character can gather vermeil at a rate of about an ounce per hour and remove impurities at a rate of about half an hour per ounce (so obtaining a clean ounce of the material requires about an hour and a half).

Steel seed is found in cinnabryl mines and must usually be purchased for the price indicated. Mixed together and heated properly (by an alchemist), two ounces of vermeil and one ounce of steel seed make two ounces of smokepowder. An ounce of smokepowder is sufficient to cause 1d2 points of damage or to launch a bullet from a wheellock pistol.

Availability of Materials

The availability of substances can influence the prices required for them. Prices on Table 15.3 are for regions where the materials are the most common. In places where the materials are less common than normal, prices might be doubled or tripled, at the DM's discretion.

Unworked cinnabryl, suitable for purchase by the ounce, is available at the given price in all lands of the Savage Coast, though high-priced compared to other necessities. Cinnabryl amulets are also fairly common throughout the region. In the east, talismans of the substance, while uncommon at best, sell for the listed price; talismans are rare in the west. Crimson essence like its base, vial, and ingredients is rare everywhere, so the prices seldom vary from those listed.

Red steel is uncommon in the east, rare in central coastal regions, and very rare in Herath and points farther west. Normal steel is common everywhere, and vermeil is always common in the cursed lands. Steel seed and smokepowder are common in Renardy and the Savage Baronies (especially in Cimarron County); however, these substances are uncommon in Bellayne and Herath, and rare west of Herath.

Inheritors control most of the commerce in cinnabryl, red steel, steel seed, and crimson essence. While these characters never use smokepowder, some Inheritor mages make it, and some Inheritor thieves market it. An Inheritor can purchase any of the magical substances for half the prices listed, if the purchase is made from another Inheritor. Note that a PC Inheritor is never simply given these materials, except as detailed in the kit's description. The materials must usually be purchased from other Inheritors.

New Weapons

Table 15.4 offers details on the new weapons available for the SAVAGE COAST campaign. Most of the weapons have special details in addition to the statistics listed in this table. Refer to the item descriptions for particulars.

Table 15.4: WEAPONS LIST

 

 

 

 

Speed

Damage

 

 

Item

Cost

Weight

Size

Type

Factor

S-M

L

Axe, Brol1

10 gp

10

L

S

9

1d10

2d8

Bok (Javelin)1

5 sp

2

S

P

132

1d6

1d6

Bolas

5 sp

2

M

B

8

1d3

1d2

Boomerang

5 gp

1

S

B

6

1d3+1

1d4+1

Crossbow, Cayma2

35 gp

7

M

P

72

1d4

1d4

Dart, Hessta1

15 sp

5

S

P

3

1d4

1d4

Grenade

10 gp

1/2

T

--2

5

12

12

Lance, Flight2

6 gp

5

L

P

6

1d6+12

2d62

Lasso2

5 sp

3

L

--2

10

--2

--2

Machete

10 gp

4

M

S

8

1d8

1d8

Maga1

25 gp

6

M

S

5

1d8

1d6

Main-Gauche2

3 gp

2

S

P/S

2

1d4

1d3

Nonaka2

1 gp

3

M

B

3

1d6

1d6

Sa2

5 sp

2

S

P/B

2

1d4

1d2

Scythe

5 gp

8

M2

P/S

8

1d6+1

1d8

Shot1

3 gp

3

S

B

3

1d6

1d6

Stiletto2

5 sp

1/2

S

P

2

1d3

1d2

Sword, Grooka1

2 gp

2

T

P/S

3

1d42

1d32

Sword, Matara2

100 gp

6

M

P/S

4

1d102

1d122

Sword, Mishiya

50 gp

3

M

P/S

3

1d8

1d8

Sword, Rapier2

15 gp

4

M

P

4

1d6+1

1d8+1

Sword, Sabre2

17 gp

5

M

S

4

1d6+1

1d8+1

War Claws2

3 gp

1/2

S

S

22

1d4

1d3

Wheellock Belt Pistol

100 gp

3

S

P

72

1d82

1d82

Wheellock Horse Pistol

200 gp

4

S

P

82

1d102

1d102

1. These weapons are typically made of primitive materials and suffer a penalty to attack and damage rolls as listed in Table 15.2. See the individual weapon descriptions to determine which materials (stone, bone, or wood) are used and which penalties apply.

2. See the weapon description for special details.

Note that hand crossbows and quarrels for hand crossbows are much more common along the Savage Coast than in other places, found most often among the enduks, in Herath, and in the Savage Baronies. On the Savage Coast, a hand crossbow can be purchased for 40 gp, quarrels for 1 sp each.

Crossbows receive a similar advantage to that of firearms in this setting. If the user has a full round to load the crossbow and get it into firing position before the round in which it is used, the speed factor for the weapon is considered to be 1. Also note the rules regarding bow and crossbow specialists in the PHB, which are detailed again in the specialisation notes in the "Proficiencies" chapter.

Ranges and rates of fire for missile weapons are given on Table 15.5. Ranges are given in tens of yards; for all weapons except wheellocks, the range should be reduced to tens of feet when indoors. The range for a lasso is always in tens of feet. A cayma crossbow bolt is exactly like that fired by a light crossbow. A bullet for a wheellock pistol (either type) costs 1 cp; four lead bullets weigh one pound.

Table 15.5: MISSILE RANGES

 

 

Range

Weapon

ROF

S

M

L

Bolas

1

3

6

9

Boomerang

1

2

4

6

Crossbow, cayma

1

6

12

18

Dart, hessta

1

1

2

4

Grenade

1

1

2

3

Lance, flight

1

1

2

3

Lasso

1*

1/2

2

3

Stiletto

2/1

1

2

3

Throwing stone

2

1

2

5

Wheellock belt pistol

1

1

3

5

Wheellock horse pistol

1/2

2

4

6

* Only one end of the lasso is thrown; a lasso can be used and recoiled once per round.

Weapon Descriptions

The following text provides specific descriptions for the weapons listed in Table 15.4.

Axe, brol: A huge battle axe with a great oval head, the brol is a common weapon among gurrash. The standard brol is made of stone, usually flint that has been chipped to achieve the desired shape. However, a weaponsmith can craft a brol from obsidian for three times the listed cost. (Obsidian is rare in the swamps of the gurrash.)

Some brols are made using the stone shape spell or the Shape Stone Legacy. A brol made with magically shaped stone costs as much as five times the standard price. Brols can also be made of metal, increasing the weight and cost of the weapon as explained under the "Stone, Bone, and Wood" heading. Brols made in either of these manners need not check for breakage, and they hit more easily (ignore the footnoted penalty) and do more damage (1d10 against small or medium creatures, 2d8 against larger creatures).

Bok (javelin): These slender javelins are wielded two-handed by caymas as pikes; however, caymas cannot throw them. Most boks are made with stone or bone heads, suffering penalties as detailed in Table 15.2. A bok can also be wielded by a larger character as a standard javelin, with the speed factor of 4.

Bolas: Bolas are typically three ropes or cords about a yard in length, knotted at one end with stone balls attached to the other end. Stone bolas do not suffer penalties as detailed in Table 15.2. Bolas can be made with metal or even hard wooden balls, but the weight is the same because the balls are then sized differently. No bonuses or penalties are imposed for metal or wooden bolas.

The wielder of the bolas whirls them by the knot, throwing them at a target. If they hit, their cords wrap around the target, and the balls smash into it as they connect. Once the bolas have wrapped around a target, it takes the victim one full round and a successful Strength check to get free. If this check fails, the victim can try again in the next round.

If called shots are used (as described in Chapter 9 of the DMG and detailed in CFH), bolas can be even more effective. A successful attack on the legs prevents the victim from walking or running, and the victim must make a successful Dexterity check just to avoid falling down. If the victim was moving when hit, a -3 penalty is applied.

A successful called shot to the arms pins both to the target's body. The victim cannot wield a weapon and does not gain AC bonuses from a shield; the victim's Strength check to become untangled receives a -2 penalty.

A successful called shot to the head causes the bolas to wrap about the target's neck. After the first round in which the bolas cause normal damage, they do 1d3 points of strangulation damage per round until removed.

Weapon proficiency with bolas is not related to any other weapon proficiency.

Boomerang: The boomerang is a specially curved and shaped hunting stick with a bevelled inside edge. Made exclusively by wallaras, the boomerang curves at an angle of more than 90 degrees, designed to return to the thrower if it misses the target. If the thrower misses the target but makes a successful Dexterity check, the boomerang returns within a few feet of the thrower at the end of the round, allowing the thrower to catch it. If the Dexterity check fails, the boomerang misses the thrower by a number of yards equal to the difference between the die roll and the Dexterity score, multiplied by 10 (so if the thrower's Dexterity were 12, and the roll 16, the boomerang would miss by 40 yards). A 1d8 roll indicates where the boomerang lands in relation to the thrower (1=north, 2=northeast, 3=east, 4=southeast, 5=south, 6=southwest, 7=west, 8=northwest).

Boomerangs are almost all made of wood but suffer none of the penalties from Table 15.2. Normal metal cannot be used to make a boomerang, but if the DM allows, a boomerang can be constructed from red steel or glassteel. Weapons made of these materials have the standard bonuses and costs for those materials.

Only someone proficient in boomerang can use one at all.

Crossbow, cayma: The cayma crossbow is exactly like a standard light crossbow, except that caymas build their crossbows with wheels and a special winding mechanism. In addition, the crossbow is balanced on its axle, so it can be tilted to aim at different heights.

A larger individual acquainted with a standard crossbow can pick up a cayma crossbow and use it normally, but caymas typically cannot use a normal crossbow unless three or more serve as a crew for it.

If the character has a full round to prepare the crossbow (so it is loaded and in firing position at the beginning of the round), the weapon's speed factor is considered to be 1. If the cayma has to single-handedly shift the crossbow to aim because a target has moved too much or to change targets, the weapon can be fired only once every two rounds.

Dart, hessta: This barbed dart is used primarily by caymas, who hurl it or thrust it like a spear. It is usually about two feet long. A larger being can throw one hessta dart per round with the same speed factor. Most hesstas are made with bone heads, suffering the appropriate penalties, but they can be made with metal heads instead.

Grenade: Caymas craft grenades of pottery. Finished grenades measure about two inches in diameter. They contain powdered herbs that explode in a cloud when the ball is cracked. When the grenade is thrown and hits a hard surface, roll 1d20; if the roll is less than 18, the ball breaks and the preparation is released.

Though the grenade causes little damage, the herbs have special effects. Cayma Wokani make three types of grenades: sleep, choke, and fog. A sleep grenade explodes in a radius of one foot, and anyone whose head (or other breathing apparatus) is within that radius must make a successful saving throw vs. breath weapon or fall asleep for 1d4 turns. A choke grenade is filled with pepper and other irritating materials. It explodes in a radius of one foot, and anyone whose head (or other breathing apparatus) is within that radius must make a saving throw vs. breath weapon or be incapacitated (unable to attack or defend) for 1d6 rounds, due to choking, sneezing, and coughing. A fog grenade explodes in a five-foot radius and obscures vision (normal and infravision) in that area for 1d6 rounds (half that in a strong wind).

Only cayma Wokani can create grenades, which are typically available only in the cayma homeland.

Lance, flight: This lance has a 10-foot shaft of tough wood and a sharp head of steel. The butt end is fletched. This lance can be used by flying humanoids as a mounted warrior might use a regular lance or can be hurled at the end of a swoop. If the flying being makes a charging attack holding the lance, it causes double damage on a successful hit.

Lasso: The lasso classifies as a large weapon because it always takes two hands to wield and requires a lot of space for use. It is a length of rope, usually about 30 feet, with a loop at the end. Before throwing a lasso, an attacker must declare whether he is conducting a normal attack or a called shot. The user holds the slack in one hand, twirls the loop with the other, and hurls the loop at a target.

The normal attack drops the loop around a target's torso to stop, dismount, or pull the target to the ground. A mounted or moving target causes a jolt to both target and attacker when the rope extends to its full length. If the target is not moving, a jolt can be caused by the attacker or the target tugging sharply on the rope. If no jolt is made, the target is simply held in place until the lasso is removed. Both attacker and target must attempt a Strength check; the character who rolls higher, while still making a successful Strength check, wins. If one succeeds and the other fails, the one who succeeds wins; if both fail, it is considered a tie. If the target wins, the lasso is torn from the attacker's hands, causing 1d2 points of damage. If the attacker wins, the target is pulled to the ground and takes 1d3 points of damage (1d2 points of damage if the target was stationary); Strength modifiers for damage apply. When the result of the Strength checks is a tie, both effects occur: the attacker takes 1d2 points of damage and loses the rope, and the target is pulled to the ground for 1d3 damage. If the attacker ties off the slack end of the rope to a stationary object, like a boulder or large tree, before throwing, no Strength roll is necessary on the attacker's part; if the target rolls his Strength score exactly, the rope breaks. Otherwise, a stationary target is not jolted, while a moving target is pulled to the ground.

Removal of the lasso normally requires one full round and a successful Strength check unless the attacker is still working to hold the lasso tight (as explained above). A lasso can also be cut. Sawing through a rope takes a full round, while chopping a rope (against a solid surface) requires a single successful attack against AC 10, with damage of 2 points or more.

An attacker can make a called shot to the legs in an attempt to trip the target. The target can make a Dexterity check, with a +6 bonus if stationary or a -3 penalty if unaware of the attack. If the Dexterity check succeeds, the target jumps out of the loop before it closes. Otherwise, the target falls down.

An attacker can instead make a called shot to the arms, to pin a target's arms to his sides. Such targets are allowed a Strength check with a +6 bonus if stationary or -3 penalty if unaware of the attack. A target whose Strength check succeeds shrugs off the lasso; otherwise, both the target's arms are pinned. Pinned targets can struggle; both attacker and target must then attempt a Strength check, and the character who rolls higher, while still making a successful Strength check, wins. When one succeeds and the other fails, the one who succeeds wins; if both fail, it is considered a tie. If the target wins, the target has freed both arms and can move, attack, and defend normally in the next round. If the attacker wins the contest, the target's arms remain pinned; the target cannot wield weapons or use a shield effectively, though he can struggle again in the next round. Each additional lasso that hits the same target gives the target a -4 penalty to his Strength check for struggling. If the total penalty reaches a number greater than the target's Strength, the target can no longer attempt to struggle free.

Attackers can also make a called shot against a target's head. If such an attack hits, the attacker can yank on the rope to cause 1d3 points of damage plus any Strength adjustment. In subsequent rounds, the attacker can yank for 1 point of damage plus modifiers due to Strength. If the attacker can somehow hoist the victim into the air by the neck, the target takes 1d4 points of strangulation damage per round (Strength modifiers do not adjust this damage). Strangling victims cannot shout or raise an alarm, but they can still use their hands. A character caught around the neck can struggle as explained under the arm-pinning attack, but hoisted targets must make a successful bend bars roll or cut the rope to escape.

Note that the lasso proficiency is essentially the same as web-casting. Also, a character with the Non-weapon proficiency of rope use receives a +2 bonus on attack rolls made with the lasso.

Machete: This is a three-foot long flat blade with a squared end, typically used to chop crops or clear underbrush but able to inflict serious damage as well.

Maga: The maga is a club about three feet long, four inches wide, and one inch thick. Sharp shards of stone are embedded along its edges. Gurrash usually make the shards of flint; obsidian shards are a sign of status, which triple the cost of the maga. The maga suffers the standard penalties for stone weapons.

The stone shards can be replaced with metal blades for extra cost and a slight increase in the club's weight.

Main-gauche: This is a large-bladed dagger with a basket hilt, often used as a secondary weapon in two-weapon fighting style. It gives a +1 to hit with disarm manoeuvres (covered in the "Proficiencies" chapter) because of the large quillions. The basket hilt can serve as a metal gauntlet in a punching attack.

Main-gauche proficiency is related to dagger proficiency.

Nonaka: Known as nunchaku in some places, the nonaka consists of two rods of hard wood (each about a foot long) connected by a short length of chain or rope. Nonakas can also be made by plating the wood with metal, adding a little weight and cost but not altering the weapon's other statistics. The weapon can be used for called shots and attempts to disarm. Though the weapon is similar in construction to a flail, the weapon proficiencies are unrelated.

Many people proficient with nonakas use two of them at once. Some take two-weapon specialisation, while some even add nonaka specialisation to that.

Sa: Known as the sai in some regions, this small, defensive weapon consists of a metal bar with a hilt and oversized, upward-curving quillions. When used by someone proficient with the weapon, a sa confers a +1 bonus when attempting disarm manoeuvres. The sa is listed as a piercing or bludgeoning weapon; it can be one or the other, but the type must be chosen by the user when it is purchased. Sa proficiency is not related to other weapon proficiencies.

Many users of sa wield two at once, some taking two-weapon style specialisation.

Scythe: A curved blade about three feet long attached to a five-foot handle, this farm tool is used both to cut grain and as a weapon. A character wields the scythe by holding the short wooden bars on the end opposite the blade. The scythe is always used as a two-handed weapon.

Shot: This is a small ball of metal that is thrown at an opponent. In primitive areas, it is made of stone and called a throwing stone, suffering penalties as detailed in Table 15.2.

Stiletto: This narrow-bladed knife is sharp at the point only. It confers a +2 non-magical bonus to attack rolls when used against plate mail (of any type), ring mail, and chain mail because its narrow point and blade can more readily slip through such armour. Stiletto proficiency is the same as knife proficiency.

Sword, grooka: This is a small sword, about dagger-sized, used by caymas. If a cayma wields a grooka two-handed, it causes damage as a short sword (1d6 points against small or medium creatures, 1d8 against larger creatures). Most grookas are made of stone and suffer appropriate penalties. The statistics in the chart are for the metal version. A grooka can be wielded as a dagger by beings larger than caymas.

Sword, matara: This is a sword very similar to a katana. It is a medium-length, slightly curved blade with no quillions (only a small, circular guard) and a hilt suitable for one-handed or two-handed use. The damages given in Table 15.4 are for one-handed use; when the weapon is wielded two-handed, its damage is 2d6 points for any size opponent. The blade is sharpened along only one edge.

Making a matara is very difficult. The technique, known only in Bellayne, is a closely guarded secret. It takes twice as long to make a matara as to make a long sword, and the weaponsmith receives a -3 penalty on proficiency checks during this attempt.

Mataras are personal weapons, often family heirlooms. A wielder often wields a mishiya at the same time.

Sword, mishiya: This is a sword very similar to the wakizashi. It is the shorter companion blade to the matara. Like the matara, it is difficult to make, usually made only in Bellayne.

Only Honourbound of Bellayne can wear both matara and mishiya. For another character to do so is to insult these Honourbound.

Sword, rapier: The rapier is a long-bladed sword, normally sharp only at the end. It is a thrusting weapon wielded for lightning-fast strikes and lunges. Most Swashbucklers of the Savage Coast choose to wield a rapier. Swashbucklers often use two-weapon style to wield a rapier and a second, shorter blade (though a two-weapon specialist may fight with two rapiers).

A rapier can be made with a basket hilt, costing an additional 2 gp and adding one pound to the weapon's weight. This allows it to be used as a metal gauntlet in a punching attack. If parrying is allowed, a rapier's basket hilt provides the same parrying bonus as the main-gauche.

Sword, sabre: The sabre is a light slashing sword, another favourite of Swashbucklers. It is fitted with a basket hilt that can be used as a metal gauntlet in punching. If parrying is allowed, the basket hilt provides the same parrying bonus as the main-gauche.

War claws: Worn mostly by rakastas, these sharp claws attach tightly to the hands and fingers with gauntlets and leather straps. These are always worn one per hand. Caymas and other tiny characters cannot use war claws, and no one without the war claws proficiency can make effective use of the weapons. War claws are considered metal gauntlets in punching attacks.

A character wearing a pair of war claws can make one extra attack each round. If the character has a natural claw attack, neither attack is made with penalties; otherwise normal penalties for fighting with two weapons apply. Similarly, the speed factor listed is for characters who do not have natural claw attacks; characters with natural claw attacks have a speed factor of 1 with war claws. War claw damage supersedes natural claw damage, rather than adding to it.

Proficiency with claws as a natural weapon also gives the character proficiency in war claws.

Wheellock pistols: The wheellock is a firearm with a spring-wound wheel, similar to that on a modern cigarette lighter. Pulling the trigger releases the wheel, which spins against a flint, spraying sparks into a priming pan to ignite the smokepowder. Wheellocks are always made with metal and wood, though stone, bone, and ivory are often used as decoration. Wheellock bullets are always metal.

The belt pistol is small enough to be carried stuck through a belt or waistband, often concealed beneath a cloak. In Cimarron and Guadalante, the belt pistol is a popular weapon of personal defence.

The horse pistol is larger than the belt pistol, up to 18 inches long. It is intended for use by riders, who can sling a holster across their saddles. At the cost of 2 gp, a large metal ball can be added to the bottom of the grip, making it less likely for the user to drop the weapon when it is drawn. The ball adds an extra pound to the weapon's weight and allows the weapon to be used as a club.

If a character has a full round to prepare (so a pistol is loaded and in firing position at the beginning of the round),the weapon's speed factor is 1 for that round.

Wheellocks can cause extra damage when they hit. If the damage roll is an 8 or 10, roll the damage die again and add the new result to the old. Each time an 8 or 10 is rolled, the die is rolled again and added to the previous total. For example, if two consecutive 8s are rolled and then a 3, a belt pistol would cause 19 points of damage.

Range modifiers are standard for firearms: -2 at medium range, -5 at long range. Unlike modifiers for the arquebus as given in the PHB, range modifiers for wheellocks are not doubled.

A firearm can also punch through armour. At short range, all armour is ignored; the target's AC depends on Dexterity, cover, and magic. At medium range, the target's AC is penalised by 5, to a maximum AC of 10. At long range, the target receives a +2 AC penalty. These penalties apply only to that portion of a character's AC that comes from armour. Dexterity and magical bonuses are unaffected. The penalty cannot make a target's AC worse than it would be if the target were wearing no armour. In terms of cover, few things will stop a bullet, particularly at short range. Characters must get behind substantial barricades to qualify for a cover bonus rather than concealment.

For various reasons, firearms sometimes fail to fire. If the attack roll with a firearm is a 1, the weapon does not fire at all. It cannot be fired again until 10 rounds are spent clearing the ruined charge from the barrel and cleaning and reloading the piece. Because of the nature of these weapons and the smokepowder of the Savage Coast, these wheellocks need not check for backfires, hanging fire, or fouling.

Caymas and other tiny creatures cannot use wheellocks, except possibly in the same manner in which they use crossbow. By attaching a frame and wheels and providing a crew of at least three caymas, they could use a pistol as a sort of cannon.

Wheellocks do not function outside the lands marked by vermeil. If taken beyond the borders of the Haze, the weapons cease to fire until brought back into the area.